CUSA Soccer

CUSA Player Feedback

Player Feedback Forms and Individual Development Plans

CUSA has developed a Player Feedback form and subsequent Individual Development Plan (IDP) for all of its players that will be used each season, in conjunction with our Game Model, Syllabus and Curriculum to provide age appropriate feedback to all of our players from their coaches.

Based on the Feedback the Players will be provided with an Individual Development Plan (IDP) to help them narrow their focus on what it is that they need to concentrate and work on more in their own free time.

The beauty of CUSA's Feedback form and IDP is that it is not generic, like you will find at most clubs and youth sport organisations, but it is in fact extremely specific and designed to complement the CUSA Game Model as well as mirror the Player Development Syllabus.

This means that not only is the feedback that the players get of excellent quality, but it is also designed specifically to help them hit the developmental targets for their age groups and provide them with objectives to hit which will help them fit in with CUSA's style of play and training.

This means that players have more control than ever on what teams they make and if they are in the starting 11 or not.

Let's take a closer look at the Feedback form and the IDP.

Below is very simply the Player's Name, the Coach's Name, The Player's Team and the Date.

Now we start to get into the Technical Competencies. These are the 'core fundamental' technical abilities that players should look to develop to their fullest capabilities.

Players that score all '10's on this part, are what you might call the 'Perfect CUSA Technical Player'.

Any areas that the player scores low on or that the coach thinks the player could improve upon, the coach will select IDP (Individual Development Plan) next to. This means that the player should work on this particular Technical Competency in their own time to bring their score up for the appropriate level of play and competition.

The Technical Competencies chosen are not random. They form what is appropriate or youth players to possess as well as those competencies that complement the CUSA Game Model and style of play.

Next, we look at the Tactical Competencies. These are the tactical objectives that a CUSA Player should look to master.

Players that score all '10s' on this part, are what you might call the 'Perfect CUSA Tactical Player'.

Any areas that the player scores low on or that the coach thinks the player could improve upon, the coach will select IDP (Individual Development Plan) next to. This means that the player should work on this particular Tactical Competency in their own time to bring their score up for the appropriate level of play and competition.

The Tactical Competencies chosen are not random. They form what is appropriate or youth players to possess as well as those competencies that complement the CUSA Game Model and style of play.

Next, we look at the Psycho Social Competencies. These are the Psycho Social objectives that a CUSA Player should look to master.

These are psychological elements that are key to a player's character, coachability and leadership.

Players that score all '10s' on this part, are what you might call the 'Perfect CUSA Psycho Social Player' and has what it takes to deal with the rigours of competitive sports.

Any areas that the player scores low on or that the coach thinks the player could improve upon, the coach will select IDP (Individual Development Plan) next to. This means that the player should work on this particular Psycho Social Competency in their own time to bring their score up for the appropriate level of play and competition.

Next, we look at the Physical Competencies. These are the Physical objectives that a CUSA Player should look to master.

These are physical elements that are key to a player being able to handle the 'rough and tumble' of a competitive contact sport.

Players that score all '10s' on this part, are what you might call the 'Perfect CUSA Physical Player' and has what it takes to deal with the rigours of competitive contact soccer.

Any areas that the player scores low on or that the coach thinks the player could improve upon, the coach will select IDP (Individual Development Plan) next to. This means that the player should work on this particular Physical Competency in their own time to bring their score up for the appropriate level of play and competition.

This part is a quick 'snap shot' so that the players can quickly see the averages across the four pillars, Technical, Tactical, Psycho Social and Physical.

This performs the same 'snap shot' function but this time in graphical form as many young players are visual learners.

This is the last piece of the Feedback form, the IDP (Individual Development Plan).

This, when coupled with the previous IDP selections made by the coach, will form the players IDP for the next 12 months.

This list of things to work on will test how much the player wants to improve and develop as well as provide him with key things to work on to help improve his game across the 12 pillars.

These activities vary in nature from stuff that can be done in the back yard, in front of a TV or computer, by reading a book, in games or by turning up early to practice.

And there you have it, a quick guide to the Player Evaluation Form and Individual Development Plan, a sure sign of CUSA's total commitment to developing every player in the CUSA family.